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Aggressive lowering of systolic BP reduces dementia risk

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Aggressive lowering of systolic BP reduces dementia risk

Significant reductions in the risk of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and the combination of MCI and dementia, have been shown for the first time through aggressive lowering of systolic blood pressure in new research results from the SPRINT MIND Study reported at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago, USA, in July.

SPRINT is a randomised clinical trial that compared two strategies for managing hypertension in older adults: an intensive strategy with a systolic blood pressure goal of less than 120 mmHg versus a standard care strategy targeting a systolic blood pressure goal of less than 140 mmHg. Previously, SPRINT demonstrated that more intensive blood pressure control reduced the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Maria C. Carrillo, the Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer, points out that these results fit well with recent population data showing reductions in new cases of dementia in developed Western cultures.

These lower rates of dementia may be occurring as these societies have begun to improve control of cardiovascular disease risk factors through medication management, reducing smoking, and greater awareness of healthy lifestyle.

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