Suggested Learning

With the vast array of food supplements around today, together with the regular onslaught of new weight loss programmes, it’s sometimes hard to remember what a healthy diet looks like. Scott Banks details a few key websites which set out the basics of good nutrition, and which pharmacy staff can recommend to customers.

British Nutrition Foundation

The British Nutrition Foundation is a registered charity that aims to provide information about good nutrition and educate the public on why lifestyle choices are important for health and wellbeing. Its website includes an extensive ‘Healthy Living’ section under which you can find a huge range of resources ranging from basic nutrition to the changing behaviours to promote healthier lifestyles. The site also includes information for all age groups from babies to adults. The BNF also has sections on nutritional science and organises and hosts events, all of which can be found on the website.

https://www.nutrition.org.uk
Tel: 020 7557 7930
E-mail: postbox@nutrition.org.uk
British Nutrition Foundation, New Derwent House, 69-73 Theobalds Road, London, WC1X 8TA

HSIS

The Health and Food Supplements Information Service provides information on vitamins and supplements. The aim of the service is to provide an understanding of the role that food supplements play in good health practise. The website provides information on all things vitamins and supplements dispelling rumours and ensuring the public has all the information it needs to fully understand whether they need supplements or not. The service primarily works with the media but has an extensive range of articles detailing nutritional information in the FAQ section.

https://www.hsis.org/did-you-know

Enjoy Food - Diabetes.org

This is a healthy eating resource for everyone – whether they have Type 1, Type 2 or another type of diabetes. It’s also relevant if a person is newly-diagnosed or has been told they are at risk of diabetes.

An important part of managing the condition is to eat a healthy, balanced diet. It emphasises that there’s no such thing as a ‘diabetic’ diet or ‘diabetic’ recipes.

The site provides advice and tips on everything from healthy swaps, understanding food labels, how to cook healthier meals, meal planning and shopping on a budget.

https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-to-diabetes/managing-your-diabetes/healthy-eating
Tel: 0345 123 2399

EAT WELL – NHS.UK

Among the numerous resources on the NHS website, its Eatwell Guide encourages users to eat a healthy, balanced diet. It emphasises that people should try to eat 5 A Day. Base meals on starchy foods like potatoes, bread, rice or pasta; have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soya drinks); eat some beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other protein; choose unsaturated oils and spreads, eaten in small amounts; and to drink plenty of fluids.

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/eat-well/

Food for the Brain

Food for the Brain is a charity that aims to provide information and raise awareness regarding how nutrition can affect mental health. The charity provides an outpatient clinic and
an international Skype call clinic in which it can provide advice regarding optimum nutritional balance to help with a variety of mental health issues. The website also includes a section called ‘Nutrition solutions’ providing a range of nutritional approaches to helping with mental health.

http://www.foodforthebrain.org

Tel: 020 8332 9600

AGE UK

As people get older it can prove more difficult to obtain all the vitamins and minerals that they need to remain healthy. On its website, Age UK looks into some of the vitamins and supplements that are often recommended for elderly stairlift users and the older generation to help improve mobility and overall health.

https://www.ageukmobility.co.uk/mobility-news/article/a-guide-to-supplements-and-vitamins

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