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Food for thought

It seems the larger multiples are all in favour of MURs. There have been reports of Cohens, Lloyds, and Boots putting significant pressure on their pharmacists to deliver more MURs. It’s not surprising – it’s been estimated that if every branch of Boots reached the maximum 400 per year, it would boost their profits by about £30 million. No wonder they like them!

It’s a plan, Jim, but not as we know it

I have just read PSNC’s Pharmacy 5 Point Forward Plan. It’s underwhelming. The opening sentence is clear: the NHS wants “radical changes.” The PSNC plan is about as radical as a group of knitwear designers coming up with a pattern for a bobble hat with two bobbles, but in different colours. At its most extreme, the word “radical” suggests revolutionary change; at the very least, it implies significant innovation.

To sell up, or not?

A Leicester contractor asks Mukesh Lad whether now is a good time to sell his business

Pork pies on the box

Am I naïve in hoping that politicians might occasionally tell the truth? I’m not talking about any old politician – I’m talking about the Prime Minister. I have just watched the unedifying spectacle of David Cameron on parliamentlive.tv misinforming Parliament over the government’s record concerning community pharmacy. I expected spin, a down-playing of the figures, but blatant misrepresentation?

CCGs are coining it from pharma

I attend a Lambeth Borough Prescribing committee meeting where pharma company rebate opportunities is a key item for discussion. A legal opinion is included in the papers suggesting CCGs are able to take rebates as incentives. Company names and percentages are mentioned but commercial sensitivity, we are told, restricts wider reporting. I am surprised to see numbers ranging from 10-35 per cent and shocked to see higher incentives for reaching manufacturer-set targets.

A pharmacist that takes pride in their work

At a time when all we seem to hear about is moaning medics, it is good to be able to report on a pharmacist who takes a pride in his work and how he goes out of his way to serve his community. And a pharmacist, too, who does not regard running his pharmacy as going to work because he enjoys it so much. I am referring to Zafar Khan, who has been operating a 24-hour pharmacy in south-west London for a couple of decades. Zafar featured in a heart-warming segment on BBC’s The One Show on April 14.

No sense in NHS strategy

It's a strange time of day, 3am. Quiet. Just the occasional creak from the central heating. The birds can't quite decide if it's time to announce the dawn. To the east, a finger of cold light nudges into the horizon, turning the Vantablack into Payne's Grey. Unfortunately I’m appreciating all of this because I'm ill. Since January I've been a patient of the NHS during the week and a victim at the weekends. It’s a contrast like no other. Longer waiting times, being forgotten, lost blood results, and I'm not exaggerating.

Should we fight, or talk?

Our recent Leicestershire federation seminar on ‘Securing your pharmacy future’ attracted over 50 independent contractors from as far afield as Leeds and Kent. With an agenda covering key business survival strategy, the biggest concern on the mind of every pharmacy owner was the financial viability of their business. Keynote speakers included business advisors from pharmacy banker Santander and leading specialist pharmacy agent Christie & Co. Both institutions insist our sector is still buoyant, but they did warn about the impact of eroding pre-tax profitability on pharmacy valuations.

Strong-armed, or what?

Iain Duncan Smith recently created a furore when he resigned from the government as Secretary of State for Work and Pensions. Yet, in the midst of the media storm his resignation created, an equally sensational story about the NHS crept under the radar. It came from former Lib Dem MP and minister in the coalition government David Laws, and it concerned the vexed question of how much extra money the NHS actually needs up to the year 2020.

Protesting about the cuts

I am attending an occasionally held NPA and NPA Insurance joint meeting today to align the strategies of both. NPAI is a wholly owned subsidiary of the NPA and it is important that the organisations work together in the best interests of members. Such meetings allow the parent company to understand the regulatory challenges of operating an insurance company and NPAI to understand the challenges faced by community pharmacists in their day-to-day practice. Satisfaction levels are high and the dedicated team for claims handling consistently receives excellent feedback.

A calmer view

Last month I was very angry. I’ve now calmed down and taken the time to read properly the letter sent by the Department of Health to PSNC concerning the proposed funding cuts. The dictatorial tone of the letter is set by its threats of cuts and closures, so a knee-jerk response is unsurprising. However, the stakeholder briefing for the future of community pharmacy is much more positive. It acknowledges the vital role of community pharmacy, and that we could play a much greater role in optimising medicines, treating minor ailments, supporting people with long-term conditions, preventive care and promoting better health.

England and Scotland: compare and contrast

I can’t help comparing and contrasting the situation facing community pharmacists in England with those in Scotland. In both countries, pharmacists are being urged by the powers that be to operate more clinically. The difference is that in Scotland, crucially, they are paid for it. There is already in Scotland a national minor ailments scheme – conspicuous by its absence south of the border – and the national chronic medication service, where pharmacists can manage the treatment of those on a stable regime.

NHS close-up

Never a week goes by these days when the NHS isn’t an entire news story. Normally we would admire, empathise and support the stresses and pressures, but until you become a patient you can’t really write a meaningful sentence about it. Since January I’ve had a bad upper respiratory tract infection. What started as a few days of non-stop coughing gave way to conking out mid-cough. It happened anytime, anywhere and after the frequency of attacks increased from once daily up to 10 or more times daily, I called 111.

Dealing with the DH bombshell

The pre-Christmas bombshell announcement on cuts to the community pharmacy budget has been exercising minds locally and nationally. Today, I am at the House of Commons making a presentation sponsored by Kate Hoey MP. Other than MPs, the invited audience includes GPs, nurses, hospital consultants, local authority councillors, CCG chairs, people from Healthwatch, social services, patient groups and NHS England and, of course, pharmacists, including NPA and Pharmacy London chairs and the RPS president – a really eclectic group! Unfortunately, a consultant from St Thomas’ cannot come due to the junior hospital doctors’ strike, which is also today.

Health Warning

I am profoundly disturbed by the government’s decision to cut our funding by 6 per cent: it is no less than an act of wanton destruction. By the government’s own estimates, as many as 3,000 pharmacies could be forced out. Obviously, our representative bodies should present a united front to fight this cut, but from what I have seen they haven’t actually grasped the underlying issue – that this is simply another step in a cynical assault on the NHS.Pharmacy Voice produced the most vigorous protest, but it won’t have the slightest effect.

No snogging in this business

Just when you thought ‘spellcheckophobia’ couldn’t be any scarier than a wooden frying pan, I was doing a snagging list for one of my rental properties. Anybody in the rental business knows about HMOs (houses in multiple occupation), sections 13 and 21 and, of course, the very expensive section eight, of the Housing Act.I have rented out houses since the 1990s and have built up a portfolio in double figures. What started out as a hobby can be quite a headache at times.

Shame on the junior doctors

Junior doctors in England went on strike for a second time on February 10. Shame on them! Call themselves professionals? I was always told that being a professional set a calling apart. Members of a profession put the public interest above their own. There are codes of conduct embodying this selfless approach. Indeed, the current code for doctors requires them to put patients first. As I have said before, I don’t see how doctors can do that if they are on strike.

Choices and decisions

There’s no doubt the Department of Health has managed to achieve what it intended with the funding cuts. Pharmacy has become a frenzy of engagement, activity and debate – something our representative bodies have never before been able to achieve. Despite years of endless conferences, campaigns and even a government-backed call to action, it’s taken a £176m threat to our income to jump-start a reaction.

Fun and games from the DH

Alistair Burt, the Heath Department Minister who has pharmacy within his portfolio, cried off at the last minute from attending the NPA’s triennial dinner in November last year. He apparently pleaded parliamentary business. But could it be that the pay cut for pharmacy that was shortly to be announced made him a reluctant attender. He could reasonably have expected that NPA chairman Ian Strachan would have made a strong case (as Ian did) for expanding the role of community pharmacists in the hard-pressed NHS and he surely would have known that pharmacy was about to face a severe haircut in the form of a reduced global sum.

A game of strategy, or fantasy?

The influence of the BBC’s ‘Dickensian’ theme seems to have reached as far as the NHS just before Christmas, with ruthless Mr Scrooge slashing pharmacy funding in an unprecedented manner. Moreover, he certainly forgot to emerge in 2016 as a reformed and generous man!By imposing a cut of £170m in pharmacy funding for 2016-17, the Global Sum will shrink to £2.63bn and our funding in cash terms will be reduced by a dramatic 6 per cent before we factor in the additional hit from national minimum wage reviews and pension contributions.

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